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Monthly Archives: September 2014

Security Advisory for Financial Institutions: Shell Shock

“Shell Shock” Remote Code Execution and Compromise Vulnerability

Yesterday evening, DHS National Cyber Security Division/US-CERT published CVE-2014-6271 and CVE-2014-7169, outlining a serious vulnerability in a widely used command line interface (or shell) for the Linux operating system and many other *nix variants.  This software bug in the Bash shell allows files to be written on remote devices or remote code to be executed on remote systems by unauthenticated, unauthorized malicious users.  Because the vulnerability involves the Bash shell, some media outlets are referring to this vulnerability as Shell Shock.

Nature of Risk

By exploiting this parsing bug in the Bash shell, other software on a vulnerable system, including operating system components, can be compromised, including the OpenSSH server process and the Apache web server process. Because this attack vector allows an attacker to potentially compromise any element of a vulnerable system, effects from website defacement to password collection, malware distribution, and retrieval of protected system components such as private keys stored on servers are possible, and the US-CERT team has rated this it’s highest impact CVSS rating of 10.0.

Please be specifically aware that a patch was provided to close the issue for the original CVE-2014-6271; however, this patch did not sufficiently close the vulnerability.  The current iteration of the vulnerability is CVE-2014-7169, and any patches applied to resolve the issue should specifically state they close the issue for CVE-2014-7169.  Any devices that are vulnerable and exposed to any untrusted network, such as a vendor-accessible extranet or the public Internet should be considered suspect and isolated and reviewed by a security team due to the ability for “worms”, or automated infect-and-spread scripts that exploit this vulnerability, to quickly affect vulnerable systems in an unattended manner.  Any affected devices that contain private keys should have those keys treated as compromised and have those keys reissued per your company’s information security policies regarding key management procedures.

Next Steps

All financial institutions should immediately review their own environments to determine that no other third-party systems that are involved in serving or securing the online banking experience, or any other publicly-available services, are running vulnerable versions of the Bash shell.  Any financial institution that provides any secure services with Linux or *nix variants running a vulnerable version of the Bash shell could be at risk no matter what their vendor mix. If any vulnerable devices are found, they should be treated as suspect and isolated per your incident response procedures until they are validated as not affected or remediated.  All financial institutions should immediately and thoroughly review their systems and be prepared to change passwords on and revoke and reissue certificates with private key components stored on any compromised devices.

For further reading on this issue:

 
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Posted by on September 25, 2014 in Security