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End-User Credential Security

07 Aug

This week’s announcement that a Russian crime syndicate has amassed 1.2 billion unique usernames and passwords across 420,000 websites would seem like startling news in 72-point font on the front of major newspapers, if it wasn’t sad it was such a commonplace announcement these days.  With four more months to go and still higher than the estimated 823 million compromised credentials part of 2013 breaches affecting Adobe to Target, it’s from Black Hat 2014 I find myself thinking about what we as ISV’s, SaaS providers, and security professionals can do to protect users in the wake of advanced persistent threats and organized, well-funded thieves wreaking havoc on the digital identities and real assets of our clients and customers.

Unlike Heartbleed or other server-side vulnerabilities, this particular credential siphoning technique obviously targeted users themselves to affect so many sites and at least 542 unique addresses affecting at least half that many unique users.  Why are users so vulnerable to credential-stealing malware?  To explore this issue, let’s immediately discard a tired refrain inside software houses everywhere: users aren’t dumb.  All too often, good application security is watered down to its least secure but most useful denominator for an overabundance of concern that secure applications may frustrate users, lower adoption, and reduce retention and usage.  While it is true that the more accessible the Internet becomes, the wider the spectrum the audience that uses it, from the most expertly capable to the ‘last-mile’ of great grandparents, young children, and the technologically unsophisticated.  However, this should neither be grounds to dismiss end-user credential security as a concern squarely in service provider’s court to address nor should it be an excuse to fail to provide adequately secure systems.  End-user education is our mutual responsibility, even if that means three more screens, additional prompts to confirm identity or action, or an out-of-band verification process.  Keeping processes as stupefying simple as possible because our SEO metrics show that’s the way to marginally improve adoption, reduce cart abandonment, or improve site usage times breeds complacency that ends up hurting us all in the long-run.

Can we agree that 1FA needs to end?  In an isolated world of controlled systems, a username and password combination might have been a fair assertion of identity.  Today’s systems, however, are neither controlled or isolated – the same tablets that log into online banking also run Fruit Ninja for our children, and we pass them over without switching out any concept of identity on a device that can save our passwords and represent them without any authentication.  Small-business laptops often run without real-time malware scanning software, easily harvesting credentials through keystroke logging, MitM attacks, cookie stealing, and a variety of other commonplace techniques.  Username and passwords fail us because they can be saved and cached just as easily as they can be collected and forwarded to command and control servers is Russia or elsewhere.  I’m not one of those anarchists advocating ‘death to the password’ (remember Vidoop?), but using knowledge-based challenges (password, out-of-wallet questions, or otherwise) as the sole factor of authentication needs to end.  And it needs to end smartly: sending an e-mail ‘out of band’ to an inbox loaded in another tab on the same machine, or an SMS message read by Google Voice in another tab means your ‘2FA’ is really just one factor layered twice instead of two-factor authentication.  A few more calls into the call center to help users cope with 2FA will be far cheaper in the long-run than the fallout of a major credential breach that affects your sites users.

We need to also discourage poor password management: allowing users to choose short or non-complex passwords and warning them about their poor choices is no excuse – we should just flatly reject them.  At the same time, we need to recognize that forcing users to establish too complex of a password will encourage them to establish a small number of complex passwords and reuse them across more sites.  This is one of the largest Achilles’s Heels for end-users: when a compromise of one site does occur, and especially if you have removed the option for users to establish a username not tied to their identity (name, e-mail address, or otherwise), you have made it tremendously easier for those who have gathered credentials from one site to have a much higher likelihood of exploiting them on your site.  Instead, we should consider nuances to each of complexity requirements that would make it likely a user would have to generate a different knowledge-based credential for each site.  While that in of itself may increase the chance a user would ‘write a password down’, a user who stores all their passwords in a password manager is still arguably more secure than the user who users one password for all websites and never writes it anywhere.

Finally, when lists of affected user accounts become available in uploaded databases of raw credentials that are leaked or testable on sites such as https://haveibeenpwned.com/ – ACT.  Find out your users that have overlap with compromised credentials on other sites, and proactively flag or lock their accounts or at least message to them to educate and encourage good end-user credential security.  We cannot unilaterally force users to improve the security of their credentials, but we can educate them, and we can make certain their eventual folly through our inaction.

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