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Security Advisory for Financial Institutions: POODLE

15 Oct

Yesterday evening, Google made public a new form of attack on encrypted connections between end-users and secure web servers using an old form of encryption technology called SSL 3.0.  This attack could permit an attacker who has the ability to physically disrupt or intercept an end-user’s browser communications to execute a “downgrade attack” that would could cause an end-user’s web browser to attempt to use the older SSL 3.0 encryption protocol rather than the newer TLS 1.0 or higher protocols.  Once an attacker successfully executed a downgrade attack on an end-user, a “padded oracle” attack could then be attempted to steal user session information such as cookies or security tokens, which could be further used to gain illicit access to an active secure website sessions.  This particular flaw is termed the POODLE (Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption) attack.  At this time this advisory was authored, US-CERT had not yet published a vulnerability document for release yet, but has reserved advisory number CVE-2014-3566 for its publication, expected today.

It is important to know this is not an attack on the secure server environments that host online banking and other end-user services, but is a form of attack on end-users themselves who are using web browsers that support the older SSL 3.0 encryption protocol.  For an attacker to target an end-user, they would need to be able to capture or reliably disrupt the end-user’s web browser connection in specific ways, which would generally limit the scope of this capability to end-user malware or attackers on the user’s local network or that controlled significant portions of the networking infrastructure an end-user was using.  Unlike previous security scares in 2014 such as Heartbleed or Shellshock, this attack targets the technology and connection of end-users.  The nature of this attack is one of many classes of attacks that exist that target end-users, and is not the only such risk posed to end-users who have an active network attacker specifically targeting them from their local network.

The proper resolution for end-users will be to update their web browsers to versions that have not yet been released that completely disable this older and susceptible SSL 3.0 technology.  In the interim, service providers can disable SSL 3.0 support, with the caveat that IE 6 users will no longer be able to access sites with SSL 3.0 without making special settings adjustments in their browser configuration.  (But honestly, if you are keeping IE 6 a viable option for your end-users, this is one of many security flaws those issues are subject to).  Institutions that run on-premises software systems for their end-users may wish to perform their own analysis of the POODLE SSL 3.0 security advisory and evaluate what, if any, server-side mitigations are available to them as part of their respective network technology stacks.

Defense-in-depth is the key to a comprehensive security strategy in today’s fast-developing threat environment.  Because of the targeted nature of this type of attack, and its prerequisites for a privileged vantage point to interact with an end-user’s network connection, it does not appear to be a significant threat to online banking and other end-user services, and this information is therefore provided as a precaution and for informational purposes only.

All financial institutions should subscribe to US-CERT security advisories and to monitor the publication of CVE-2014-3566 once released for any further recommendations and best practices.  The resolution for end-users of updated versions of Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, and Safari which remove all support for the older SSL 3.0 protocol will be made through their respective vendor release notification channels.  For more information from US-CERT once published, refer to the Google whitepaper directly at https://www.openssl.org/~bodo/ssl-poodle.pdf

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Posted by on October 15, 2014 in Security

 

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